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Foucault and Heidegger Critical Encounters (Contradictions (Minneapolis, Minn.), 16.)

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Published by University of Minnesota Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Biography & Autobiography,
  • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -,
  • Heidegger, Martin,,
  • Foucault, Michel,
  • Heidegger, Martin,
  • Philosophy,
  • History & Surveys - Modern,
  • 1926-1984,
  • Philosophers,
  • 1889-1976,
  • Foucault, Michel,

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsAlan Milchman (Editor), Alan Rosenberg (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages260
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8070382M
ISBN 100816633789
ISBN 109780816633784

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Foucault and Heidegger stages a crucial critical encounter between these two thinkers; in doing so, it clarifies not only the complexities of the Heidegger-Foucault relationship but also their relevance to questions about the truth and nihilism, acquiescence and resistance, and technology and agency that are central to debates in contemporary thought. Foucault and Heidegger stages a crucial critical encounter between these two thinkers; in doing so, it clarifies not only the complexities of the Heidegger-Foucault relationship, but also their relevance to questions about truth and nihilism, acquiescence and resistance, and technology and agency that are central to debates in contemporary by: In a late interview, Foucault, suggested that Heidegger was for him the "essential philosopher." Taking this claim seriously, Mapping the Present assesses the relationship between these two thinkers, particularly on the issue of space and history. In the process, his book also reveals the role that Heidegger's reception in France played in Foucault's intellectual development—the first major work to do so while taking full advantage of the recent publication of Foucault's last Collège de France lectures of the s, which mark a return to classical Greek and Roman philosophy, and thus.

In this pricey book, Timothy Rayner hypothesizes that Foucault acknowledges a debt to Heidegger "at precisely the same time as he came to understand philosophy as a self-transformative activity of thought," and that "Foucault appropriated, modified and began to articulate a quasi-Heideggerian transformative philosophical practice.".   Foucault transforms Heidegger's focus on things to a focus on selves and how they became subjects. [You should read the paper, it's fun] [You should read the paper, it's fun] His stated goal in the paper is to push the correlation between the two as far as he can and see where it goes.   Martin Heidegger () and Michel Foucault () are two of the most important philosophers in the history of twentieth century European thought. There is clearly much that divides them. Heidegger devoted his life to a single question, the question of being.   event in Foucault and Heidegger. Still my instinctive feeling is that Heideggerian conception of event still carries lot of load of Metaphysics or something like it (do not know what:) Some of these responses are cut from a piece I've been working on on Heidegger's Beitraege, which only receives brief treatment in my book. The.

Foucault Foucault develops the perspectives of Nietzsche and Heidegger, accepting “their fundamental assumption of cultural crisis, of a derelict present, of a nothing out of which everything must be created” ().4/5. Foucault's philosophical relationship to Heidegger is the subject of academic debate. This book provides an approach to Foucault and Heidegger's relationship, based in an original approach to the problem itself. It also identifies a Heideggerian style of thinking in Foucault's work, which emerges in his early studies of madness and literature. Foucault and Heidegger stages a crucial critical encounter between these two thinkers; in doing so, it clarifies not only the complexities of the Heidegger-Foucault relationship, but also their.   In the process, his book also reveals the role that Heidegger's reception in France played in Foucault's intellectual development—the first major work to do so while taking full advantage of the recent publication of Foucault's last Collège de France lectures of the s, which mark a return to classical Greek and Roman philosophy, and thus Pages: